Tag: cremation

cheap $20 urn for rachelI have decided to spread Rachel’s ashes in England.  It is a place she always wanted to go but wasn’t able to visit. I have plenty of family there and I feel confident in my decision to put her cremated remains to rest.  I can’t believe I am going to leave her on another continent but its all the more reason to return as soon as I am financially able.

I had to purchase a real urn so Norwegian Airlines will let me bring her and I’ll bring her death certificate just in case. I’ll donate the urn or chuck it when I’m done.  Trying to find a place to spread her ashes, legally, and pick a few nice words to say. It will be my kids, partner and my parents. I have to find a place to spread her ashes.  Any suggestions in London, Weymouth or Cardiff, let me know.

These are three poems I found:

She is gone – By David Harkins

You can shed tears that she is gone
or you can smile because she has lived.

You can close your eyes and pray that she’ll come back
or you can open your eyes and see all she’s left.

Your heart can be empty because you can’t see her
or you can be full of the love you shared.

You can turn your back on tomorrow and live yesterday
or you can be happy for tomorrow because of yesterday.

You can remember her and only that she’s gone
or you can cherish her memory and let it live on.

You can cry and close your mind, be empty and turn your back
or you can do what she’d want: smile, open your eyes, love and go on.

Loving Memories (Your Gentle Face) – Author Unkown
Your gentle face and patient smile
With sadness we recall,
You had a kindly word for each
And died beloved by all.
The voice is mute and stilled the heart
That loved us well and true,
Ah, bitter was the trial to part
From one so good as you.
You are not forgotten Rachel
Nor will you ever be,
As long as life and memory last
We will remember thee.
We miss you now, our hearts are sore,
As time goes by we miss you more.
Your loving smile, your gentle face,
No one can fill your empty place.

Remember Me – Author Unknown
To the living, I am gone
To the sorrowful, I will never return
To the angry, I was cheated
But to the happy, I am at peace
And to the faithful, I have never left
I cannot speak, but I can listen
I cannot be seen, but I can be heard
So as you stand upon the shore
Gazing at the beautiful sea, remember me
As you look in awe at a mighty forest
And in its grand majesty, remember me
Remember me in your hearts,
In your thoughts, and the memories of the
Times we loved, the times we cried,
the battle we fought and the times we laughed
For if you always think of me,
I will never have gone.

It’s easier said than done.  Having your child die.

For years I could speak about having a terminally ill child quite easily as I had clearly removed myself from what that really meant.  I sit here next to a box of ashes that holds the true meaning of “terminally ill” and I am frozen.

After she was diagnosed with Juvenile Batten Disease I set out on many road trips to take her and my other 3 kids places, while we could.  Making the most of life, making loads of awesome memories.  On every road trip, as the kids were listening to books on tapes or watching a movie, my mind would always wander and I would think long and hard about what I wanted to do to celebrate her life when the time came.

My rule, without question, was to spread her ashes within 48 hours.

I have had her ashes for a week.

They sit next to me while I work, sit in my lap while I stare at the wall from the couch and they either lay next to me in bed or on the table next to where I sleep.

48 hours is long since gone and I can’t seem to part with her.  I’m a very pragmatic person but I guess the Mum in me has beat out the pragmatic side of me because I still can’t bring myself to let her ashes go.  I have gone on amazon and looked at urn necklaces and have purchased two of them.  They’re quite inexpensive, in comparison to how much an urn costs at a funeral home.  I think Julie would like one also and I think she is old enough to carry it around with her, emotionally.  She has had to live through this right along side me.

Here are the two necklaces that I have found and purchased so far (pics from amazon.com):

Tree of Life

(I think Julie will like this one):

Butterfly

I like this one.  When she was definitely dying I told her many times that it was ok to fly away like a butterfly. My friend, Anna, was right there with me and has a new butterfly tattoo in Rachel’s memory.  If this butterfly necklace does not suck I will get one for Anna also.  Friends like her don’t come around very often.

Well.  What do you think?

No matter how many years you have to prepare, you’ll never be ready to say goodbye to your child. She deserved a better, real, life. I tried to make the most out of the life she had. She was my #1 pain in the ass and the feeling of emptiness she has left in our lives is greater than I could have imagined. As we move forward the kids and I have to try and find ways to fill in the void a little at a time.

Thank you to everyone who has supported me, Rachel and my children through this. It definitely takes a village to live through some of the shit that life puts out.

I booked a handicap accessible house in MOAB a few months ago and tomorrow we leave, without her. It feels wrong to go on holiday but it’s non-refundable and the condo has a pool. Swimming and sun will be good for the kids, getting out of this house will be good for me. 🙁